Wrap Up: Delft Design Approach in context

Wrap Up: Delft Design Approach in context

Delft Design Approach in context: a general view on design education … Delft Design Approach in context: the Delft Innovation Model … Studying Industrial Design Engineering in Delft
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Summaries

  • Wrap Up: Delft Design Approach in context > Delft Design Approach in context: a general view on design education > General view of Delft Design education
  • Wrap Up: Delft Design Approach in context > Delft Design Approach in context: the Delft Innovation Model > The Delft Design Approach in context: The Delft Innovation model
  • Wrap Up: Delft Design Approach in context > * Sofa session - Reflection on week 7: Testing with users & final presentation > Sofa session wrap up week
  • Wrap Up: Delft Design Approach in context > *Sofa session - Reflection on the MOOC & presentations > Reflection on the MOOC & presentations

Wrap Up: Delft Design Approach in context > Delft Design Approach in context: a general view on design education > General view of Delft Design education

  • Until now you have been designing something special to make experiencing Morning Rituals more friendly, more interesting, more joyful or what else you have proposed in your own design brief to take up as a design challenge.
  • In real design practice, there are many more activities that go before and go after this.
  • There are many stakeholders that have influence on what you as a designer are going to design and whether or not your final design is satisfying.
  • Important stakeholders are the managers of the designers if you are working for a company, or it is the principal or the external client they work for as you work for a design agency.
  • In good professional design practice designers are always participating in formulating the design brief together with the other key stakeholders.
  • Our mission in Delft is to educate designers that serve the companies they work for and the users they design for.
  • We train them to use their design knowledge, skills, ambitions, values and norms and experiences to help companies and brands to blossom by designing valuable and meaningful products and services for the customers that those companies serve.
  • Delft designers are not ego-driven, but company or brand driven in their attitude and in their resulting designs.
  • Delft designers are designing for users, not for themselves.
  • Important for our design approach is that we see the user in a very broad perspective; not only the direct end-user like the driver of a car, but we take also in account other stakeholders.
  • The full Delft Design Approach is much more than just train our students in all kinds of different design methods, and to infuse them with our user centeredness.
  • If we use a metaphor to compare designing a product with preparing a meal, then we have limited ourselves till now in this course by talking only about the kitchen appliances, the recipes and the eaters, but we have fully forgotten to tell you about the ingredients and the quality of the meal.
  • So the methodological Delft design approach is built on four fundamental content related disciplines.
  • Neccessary not only for the required mechanics and the constructions of the new to be designed products, as well as to know how to produce those products in large quantities and the right qualities in the factory.
  • To us in Delft it is only one of at least four more or less equal aspects of designing.
  • A famous quote of American, France born, design hero Raymond Loewy illustrates this: “The nicest curve is the sales curve!” This is not only about money, but includes also corporate strategy, marketing, market intelligence and branding.
  • This balancing and integrating is the main function of all the design methods combined.
  • Design methodology and design theory is in Delft not seen as a separate, fifth foundational discipline.

Wrap Up: Delft Design Approach in context > Delft Design Approach in context: the Delft Innovation Model > The Delft Design Approach in context: The Delft Innovation model

  • In Delft we have developed a five stage overall model of this corporate innovation process.
  • In each stage this idea is progressed, from idea to a sketch, from sketch to concept, from concept to prototype, and finally from prototype to production model.
  • The Delft Innovation Model is a circular model that consists of 5 stages.
  • The end of stage 1 is the beginnings of stage 2; the end of stage 2 is the beginnings of stage 3 etcetera.
  • The end of stage 5 is the beginnings of the next stage 1 because we have closed the innovation loop.
  • As said, the DIM-model consist of five stages: Product Use Strategy Formulation Design Brief Formulation Development Market Introduction The ending block of each previous stage is the same as the starting block of the next stage.
  • In the circular model each stage shares this joint block.
  • All end with an evaluation and reflection step in which is decided to jump over to the next stage or, if the quality of the progress is too low, to redo this stage.
  • As said before this starting situation is equal to the end result of the previous stage.
  • After evaluating this interim result – for example those sketches – one of those sketches will be choosen as the end result of this stage.
  • This final sketch will be the starting situation for the next stage, which progresses on the same way.
  • Looking to all stages you see each time a diverging part, followed by a converging part.
  • This new product will be progressed through all five stages.
  • Our starting point for the corporate innovation process is that the competitive environment of every company, say Petterson’s micro brewery in Copenhagen in Denmark, is full of products and services being sold and used by the targetted customers of that company.
  • According to our model this stage is called the Product Use stage.
  • Danish people are not only drinking Danish beer, they drink sometimes Heineken from Holland or Budweiser from the US. Other people or sometimes even the same people drink, not only beer, but they drink wine and water, or coffee.
  • So there are many differences to notice in the Danish beer consumer market.
  • Noticing these external changes and trying to turn them into new internal business propositions is the starting point of all corporate product and service innovation processes.
  • Okay, after some long time, we have arrived at the next Product Use stage: the new Petterson’s beer is now being consumed and has been paid for.
  • Before arriving here it was a long story: We have started this corporate innovation cycle in the previous Product Use stage, a long while back, when there was not only no “Gammle Viking” beer available, but it was not even conceptualised either.
  • In the Strategy Formulation stage he developed his innovation strategy: he wanted to produce a special tasteful, typically Danish beer, celebrating Viking heritage.
  • In the next Design Brief Formulation stage he had to find or to grow special herbs he needed for this typically historical beer.
  • At the end he and his friends are happy with this new taste.
  • The new beer is only available at his micro brewery a couple of liters at the time.
  • Large breweries talk about hectoliters! In the Development stage Oskar had to think about how to brew the beer in the right quantities.
  • Should he expand his micro brewery, or should he outsource the brewing of the new beer to another brewery? He had to think about putting the new beer in bottles or not? If he wanted bottles: should it be a new design or just a standard bottle? This choice would have big financial consequences.
  • For the marketing part of his new beer he had to think about the name of the new beer, a label on the bottle, think about advertisements and posters.
  • Numerous of these marketing things had to be decided upon in this Development stage.
  • In the next Market Introduction stage all details should fall in place.
  • During this stage he was surrounded with all his helpers in a kind of multi-disciplinary innovation team.
  • His financial friend, his marketing neighbour, two of his drinking mates and the interior architect were not only “testing” the new beer, but were also discussing evening after evening all the major subjects of this innovation process.
  • For instance for showing the authenticity of the new beer they had suggested that Oskar should do a little of the brewing inside the pub, so people could really see that he was the originator-brewer.
  • Just before opening the pub, they made a late night decision on the name of the new beer: “Gammle Viking”, meaning Old Viking.
  • The rest is history: now “Gammle Viking” is a very nice and tastefull addition to the Danish beer market.
  • Some day in the future another Danish beer lover will discover some new changes in the market and with her new innovation she will blow away “Gammle Viking”.

Wrap Up: Delft Design Approach in context > * Sofa session – Reflection on week 7: Testing with users & final presentation > Sofa session wrap up week

  • Welcome at already the eight sofa session, a reflection on week 7 about testing with users and final presentation.
  • We’re leaving the design phase and entering the deliver phase, as you can see here.
  • At the discussion forum I have found results from user test and the final presentations.
  • If you test with users then bear in mind that it is important to know what you want to know from your user, but also if it is possible to test it.
  • So then you need to consider if you can simulate the whole experience or if not you can better test something else and postpone the selection of the color or base your color selection on a theory.
  • This may lead to new criteria and consequently to another iteration in your design process.
  • As a designer your constantly weighing, what is most important and what is less important.
  • Actually it’s almost finished model, it’s not very complex model, but you can test the total experience.
  • The user is in this case a cat and so what can you do? You can’t ask the cat something, so she based her findings on the observations that she did.
  • Actually she made two concepts and we are still curious which concept was actually the best one.
  • Her challenge was to design something that make you use less salt and she designed a very nice device.
  • I think it is very well done, it is a working prototype or partly working and there are some insights also about the use from one participant.
  • I showed both of these examples because I think they are very different in a way and the perfect situation would be that you combine, that you can really come to a concept that has everything in it.
  • That you can test the total experience, the ascetics and the technical functioning.
  • You know design is ultimately a process of many iterations.
  • Just be sure that you communicate your concept well with enough details and preferably into the context of use, like in the work of pauroyjj.
  • Finally I would like to empathize that we the running delft designer team, enjoy your participation a lot.

Wrap Up: Delft Design Approach in context > *Sofa session – Reflection on the MOOC & presentations > Reflection on the MOOC & presentations

  • That brings me to my interest is actually: Are we moving to a kind op global world? Actually our morning rituals will be more less the same, because I see a lot of concepts that are maybe culture specific and so my question is actually: Is your design culture specific in a way.
  • Are we moving to a global world or do we still design culture specific products? Oke we are back at the faculty and we are at the last sofa session and I’m here in a kind of morning ritual together with Koen, you know from the benchmark video’s and Romy, She helped you at the discussion forum.
  • Ok, Romy and Koen how did you actually expierenced this whole Delft Design Approach? Yeah well it was fantastic I would say, like all the nice reactions we got and amazing presentations we have seen so far.
  • That you know how find your first solutions and that you understand distinctions like faces, you have activities, you have divertion and convertion.
  • So actually you will also have experienced that you have a lack of knownledge, about estatics, about technical aspects, meterials and properties or costs or about sustainability.
  • In practice designers are very trained and know a lot about different disciplines and domains and usually work together.
  • So see this as a first start and also be very proud of it that you finalized this course.
  • Let’s go! Oke we will send the participants the Delft Design Guide.
  • We are very grateful that you participated in our course, And we wish you a meaningful design career! “.

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