Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning

MOOC Summaries - Fullbridge - Career Edge - Communication and Teamwork - Effective Teamwork and Project Planning

Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning

“Introduction to Effective Teamwork and Project Planning … Building Effective Teams: Forming, Storming, and Norming … Performing: Achieving Synergy with Your Team … Project Planning … Conclusion”
(Source)

Summaries

  • Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 1: Introduction to Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > 2.3.1.1. Introduction to Working In Teams
  • Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 2: Building Effective Teams: Forming, Storming, and Norming > 2.3.2.2. Forming Teams
  • Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 3: Performing: Achieving Synergy with Your Team > 2.3.3.2. Being an Effective Contributor
  • Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 3: Performing: Achieving Synergy with Your Team > 2.3.3.6. An Ineffective Team Meeting
  • Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 4: Project Planning > 2.3.4.1. What is Project Planning?
  • Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 4: Project Planning > 2.3.4.8. Tracking
  • Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 4: Project Planning > 2.3.4.12. Conclusion Video
  • Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 5: Conclusion > 2.3.5.2. Working Effectively on Teams and Projects

Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 1: Introduction to Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > 2.3.1.1. Introduction to Working In Teams

  • At some point, you may have competed on a sports team, collaborated on a school project, or joined a group volunteer effort.
  • Some of these teams may have performed exceptionally well; others may have run into some trouble.
  • While there are many different reasons why a team can fall apart, there are a few key attributes that all high-performing teams share.
  • First, we’ll explore the popular Bruce Tuckman model for team formation, development, and performance.

Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 2: Building Effective Teams: Forming, Storming, and Norming > 2.3.2.2. Forming Teams

  • Organizations rely on teams to tackle complex and large-scale assignments.
  • Some teams are a fixed part of an organization and other times teams are formed as tasks and projects arise.
  • As a result, knowing when to work with others is often just as important as knowing how to work with others.
  • When is it appropriate to work in teams? Large-scale assignments are a good place to start.
  • In these situations, your boss assumes that you’ll delegate some of this work to others; your job is simply to make sure your team delivers.
  • Be on the lookout for situations in which you have too much work, lack expertise, or need creative inspiration.
  • These are opportunities to use teams to build lasting connections, accomplish more, and gain credibility.

Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 3: Performing: Achieving Synergy with Your Team > 2.3.3.2. Being an Effective Contributor

  • When you think of an effective contributor, what qualities come to mind? Understanding what you value in others will help you to model your behavior to bring the same positive contributions to your teams in the future.
  • Most teams are intentionally built with a combination of skills and personalities.
  • Mutual appreciation across a team will build confidence and increase efficiency.
  • With a self-starting, positive attitude and a willingness to take on new challenges, your presence can increase productivity and help your team to become happier and more cohesive.

Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 3: Performing: Achieving Synergy with Your Team > 2.3.3.6. An Ineffective Team Meeting

  • Examples of communication in ineffective team meetings:
    • Do you have any idea why this meeting was called? Cause I could have sworn that we already talked about product road mapping.
    • Did you read recap notes from the last meeting? I didn’t get a chance to – that’s why I thought this meeting would be helpful.
    • Well, we all agreed to move forward with push notifications.
    • That’s fine, but last meeting we already decided that we would review the research and the pros and cons.
    • We decided to move forward with the notifications.
    • I, uh, wasn’t 100% sure what this meeting was for.
    • Priya, you really should have read the recap notes from the last meeting.
    • You’ve called a meeting to discuss something that we’ve already discussed.

Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 4: Project Planning > 2.3.4.1. What is Project Planning?

  • What exactly is project management? Effective project management is an art, and professionals who master this skill are in high demand across all industries.
  • Don’t be intimidated! Whether you know it or not, you’re probably familiar with many of the key principles of project planning already.
  • In all of these scenarios, you created a plan, managed a timeline or budget, anticipated major obstacles, and saw your project through to completion.
  • In the following units, we’ll tackle the key elements of effective project planning, including time management, task and resource prioritization, and project leadership.

It’s tremendously satisfying to see a project through from the initial planning phases to final completion and success!

Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 4: Project Planning > 2.3.4.8. Tracking

  • As everyone starts plugging away, how do you know what’s getting done? You can have faith in your team, but when it comes to analyzing progress, you should have a tracking system in place.
  • You’ll want to meet with your team regularly to get a sense of everyone’s progress, challenges, and victories.
  • You’ll want to align your tracking processes and meeting frequency with the intensity and complexity of the project.
  • Trust your gut and don’t create a complex tracking system if it’s not needed! Use tracking tools to manage assigned tasks and objectives.
  • If possible, use a shared tracking system or calendar to make this easier.
  • The only catch is that a tracking tool is only effective when everyone checks, updates, and references it regularly.
  • There are numerous project tracking tools available.

Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 4: Project Planning > 2.3.4.12. Conclusion Video

  • You did it! The project’s complete! You delegated tasks, tracked progress, avoided scope creep, and reached your goal.
  • Now it’s time to reflect on what you’ve done.
  • After putting so much time and energy into a project, it can be hard to separate yourself from the end result.
  • You’ll also want to set aside time to debrief with your team.
  • When leading your team reflection, use the Stop/Keep/Start technique to help frame the conversation.
  • What worked well? Recognize the patterns that strengthened your team.
  • Honest reflection is uncomfortable, but your team can only improve by identifying weaknesses and trying to address them.
  • As you look forward to future projects, keep these insights in mind.

Section 3: Effective Teamwork and Project Planning > Subsection 5: Conclusion > 2.3.5.2. Working Effectively on Teams and Projects

  • Up next, we’ll have you put your knowledge to the test with a series of real life scenario-based questions.
  • Keep in mind that the assessment is timed, so do your best to schedule a dedicated time window to complete it.
  • Think about how to apply what you’ve learned to your own professional development.
  • With focus and practice, these skills will lead you to major career growth!

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