Section 2: Design Thinking

Section 2: Design Thinking

“Introduction … Inspiration … Ideation … Implementation”
(Source URL)

Summaries

  • Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 1: Introduction > 3.2.1.1. Introduction to Design Thinking
  • Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 2: Inspiration > 3.2.2.7. What Are Needs?
  • Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 3: Ideation > 3.2.3.3. Foundations of Brainstorming During Ideation
  • Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 4: Implementation > 3.2.4.3. Implementation and Testing
  • Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 4: Implementation > 3.2.4.7. Introducing Your Solution
  • Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 5: Conclusion > 3.2.5.2. Revisiting Design Thinking

Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 1: Introduction > 3.2.1.1. Introduction to Design Thinking

  • You could give up – but then, you wouldn’t solve the problem.
  • So what do you do? Design thinking is a framework that helps you solve problems both large and small.
  • It will help you think creatively to find unexpected solutions.
  • We’ll dive into the five whys strategy, figure out user needs, and explore ways to implement and test solutions.
  • Scratch the word “Impossible” from your vocabulary.
  • By the time you’ve made it through this content, every problem you face will be solvable.

Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 2: Inspiration > 3.2.2.7. What Are Needs?

  • You’ll identify the “User” need.
  • You’ll design a product or solution aimed at addressing these needs.
  • When GE Healthcare designer Doug Dietz observed that his MR Scanner terrified young patients, he identified a user need.
  • User needs can have functional, emotional, or social dimensions.
  • Your solutions may satisfy at least one of these needs.
  • The wearable activity tracker, FitBit, meets all three need dimensions: The functional need to track exercise and work towards health goals.
  • The emotional need to create incentives for a healthy lifestyle.

Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 3: Ideation > 3.2.3.3. Foundations of Brainstorming During Ideation

  • The goal is to generate as many ideas as possible and use the collective creativity of your team.
  • Brainstorming is also a lot of fun! It’s a time when you can turn on your creative mind and not worry about having perfect ideas.
  • You just saw a team struggle to create brainstorming momentum.
  • Don’t Judge: As you throw out ideas, prevent yourself and others from judging them.
  • When brainstorming, all ideas are good ideas, refrain from negativity to keep the creativity flowing.
  • Aim for quantity: Keep the ideas coming! When brainstorming, more is better.
  • The more ideas you generate, the more you will be able to find patterns, connections and themes you’ll discover.
  • Get Weird: Absurd ideas can lead to creative solutions.
  • Build on Thoughts: Stay on topic and encourage the team to evolve ideas, push your thinking further to build momentum.
  • Let’s take a look at a team in the midst of a creative session.
  • We could probably integrate the brand color idea into this, too.

Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 4: Implementation > 3.2.4.3. Implementation and Testing

  • The final step in the design thinking process is implementation, where you’ll test out your prototypes with users.
  • When you’re testing your solution, remember to: Stay Quiet: You don’t need to provide too much context for your design.
  • Keep it Real: Try to create a realistic scenario for your users to test your prototype.
  • You won’t get accurate feedback if you ask users to test a pair of swim goggles on dry land.
  • Test Multiple Models: If you can, give your testers more than one prototype to test, this will allow them to compare and share their preferences.
  • The design process should be a fun one! If and when your prototype fails, try not to worry.

Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 4: Implementation > 3.2.4.7. Introducing Your Solution

  • To gain attention, tell a story that positions your solution as a vehicle for your organization’s growth.
  • Tie your solution to positive change and forward-thinking.
  • To create an internal buzz, recruit your colleagues to help you spread the word about your proposed solution and encourage advocacy.
  • To encourage engagement, keep your messaging simple and stay focused on the “Why” of your solution, not necessarily the “How.” In any situation, keep your audience in mind.

Section 2: Design Thinking > Subsection 5: Conclusion > 3.2.5.2. Revisiting Design Thinking

  • Look at them as reminders that, when you know your stuff, you’re effectively entering the big leagues of professional thinking.
  • It doesn’t end here – in the next section, we’ll ask you to use research under the design thinking and problem solving lens, so you can successfully find and support superior solutions.

Return to Summaries List.

(image source)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *