Module 1: The Digital Consumer

Module 1: The Digital Consumer

“The Digital Consumer”
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Summaries

  • Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Welcome
  • We learned about consumer empowerment, loss of marketer control, and the growing empowerment we see among consumers
  • Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Loss of marketer control
  • Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Consumer engagement
  • Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Consumer empowerment
  • Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Participation branding and engagement
  • Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Summary

Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Welcome

  • We learned about consumer empowerment, loss of marketer control, and the growing empowerment we see among consumers.
  • Don’t forget to complete the To Do Task at the end of the module.

We learned about consumer empowerment, loss of marketer control, and the growing empowerment we see among consumers

  • SONIA: To learn more about paid, owned, and earned media, I spoke with Adam Marshall from Mindshare Asia-Pacific.
  • Adam speaks about the importance of synergy between paid, owned, and earned media, and also provides some great campaign examples.
  • We’re actually the largest media agency network in Asia-Pacific.
  • Paid media tends to be the traditional media infantry that we would normally buy for a client.
  • Owned media tends to be media access the client already has.
  • Then earned media is media where the consumer has remarketed our ideas as part of the campaign.
  • It’s usually some form of interaction on a peer-to-peer basis that we try to harness and solicit throughout the campaign process.
  • Every Mindshare campaign these days includes a paid, owned and earned element.
  • The expectation from clients and the way that the agency is constructed is that we would always respond to a client brief with a paid, owned, and earned solution.
  • The campaign had a really nice interactive element that was designed to sort of solicit an owned and earned response as well.
  • What we had arranged was for the news media to cover the event.
  • We filmed in news media, so the news articles ran what was happening that was re-broadcast back onto the nightly news.
  • So the campaign really touched each of those elements: paid, owned, and earned.
  • As a result, the impact of the campaign was far greater than it would if you’d just gone down some traditional media solution to the brief.
  • The reality is these days, all clients expect this as part of the media solution.
  • In that process, we are deconstructing every client brief and looking for opportunities across paid, owned, and earned media.
  • So in terms of clients’ expectations and in terms of how the agency will respond to any brief, this is now, I would say, the norm across the industry.
  • I think the sort of more traditional media, the process has been in place a long time.
  • Especially when you get into the earned space and you start using the consumer as part of the marketing process.
  • Very often, I think we are surprised, very pleasantly surprised, by how consumers are taking our ideas and then remarketing to their own peer groups.
  • I think that’s one of the nice things about where the media is as an industry today.
  • So actually learning from the consumers in real time about what they’d like or dislike about a campaign and making changes across paid, owned, and earned in response to that.
  • SONIA: So from Adam’s interview, you will have learned about paid, owned, and earned media.
  • Some great information about client examples and also organisational willingness to invest in a paid, owned, earned solution.

Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Loss of marketer control

  • How does technology change consumer expectations and behaviours – how do you keep up? Technology is moving so fast the consumer has a very hard time to keep up with it.
  • The power shift is from media companies who used to control what we saw, when we saw it, and how we saw it.
  • Or what we consumed and when we consumed and what we knew about what we consumed.
  • Technology and innovation has created that shift and the power paradigm.
  • I think a lot of us feel like we’re trying to invent the future a little bit and we’re trying to get people to use their phones in ways that they just hadn’t used them before.
  • Like it’s obvious that you open up your phone and ask the maps or search for some sort of site, like a question when you’re lost right? When we think about it – how can software help you get lost in certain ways.
  • Like if you’re in a familiar neighborhood – how can software push you to do something that you wouldn’t have done before? How can it encourage you to go to places that you haven’t gone? How can it make you travel a little bit further to go try something you haven’t done before? And we think of this idea of like software as a motivator and that’s OK, that’s a new thing and people aren’t used to software suggesting what they should do before they ask for it.

Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Consumer engagement

  • I’m going to tell you a story about a car built for individuals.
  • The story is driven by you with actual tweets you sent to Jimmy Fallon.
  • ‘Girl, today’s your lucky day!’ She picked up a German hitchhiker who came to America to study farming – how charming.
  • Discussing their mutual love for sweaters, they drove past an alpaca farm.
  • This was a story that started with you, because luxury always should.

Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Consumer empowerment

  • Our 18-year-old son Ryan was kicked out of Boy Scouts simply because he’s gay.
  • She’s in serious need of a lung transplant but a national organ rule may be standing in her way.
  • Family and friends are fighting for her, circulating this petition on change.org.
  • A website in 196 countries dedicated to social change.
  • An American soldier desperately tried to rescue an Afghan translator.
  • He’ll die, no question about it, they’ll torture him in front of his family.
  • How could you not care about women being attacked every single day.
  • We should start celebrating women, so young women have role models to look up to.
  • I’m not going anywhere I’m staying until i’m included.
  • As secretary I would urge you to allow that lung transplant to move forward.
  • In your gut, do you think you’re going to get the world changed? In my gut, I’m about to throw the Hail Mary pass.
  • Major breaking news, big change afoot in an iconic American institution.

Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > Participation branding and engagement

  • SONIA: To learn more about the digital consumer and concepts such as participation branding and related challenges around participation branding, I spoke with Nicole Cikarela from Marketforce.
  • We do everything from planning, marketing plans, media strategies, all the way through to creative development and production.
  • Participation branding has many names and many forms.
  • An innovative way that lots of, or increasingly, brands are using social media and participation branding, is the idea of a social media mission control room or war room.
  • When you build a team around an event or something that’s going to create a lot of talk on social media, and you have them all in one place, monitoring what’s happening on social media and responding very quickly, in clever or interesting ways.
  • The NRL in the Eastern States, recently did a really successful application of the social media mission control room around the State of Origin series of rugby league games, where they’ve taken that same idea and applied it locally.
  • In my opinion, the biggest obstacle, and the most difficult one to overcome, would be company culture and the idea that engaging and creating participation with a brand will expose the brand to risk.
  • To kind of change, to be able to overcome those obstacles, it’s about changing people’s mindset and reducing their fear to getting people engaging with their brand.
  • SONIA: Nicole’s interview highlights the importance of digital consumers in the branding process and underscores the importance of co-creation in that strategy.

Module 1: The Digital Consumer > The Digital Consumer > SummaryV

  • In this module you were introduce to the Paid, Owned and Earned Media framework and Adam Marshall from Mindshare Asia-Pacific gave some great content around those key concepts.
  • We looked at Glad Wrap and we looked at airline passenger travel and they really bring that concept to life.
  • We examined participation branding and advocacy and Nicole Cikarela from Marketforce gave some excellent content around those concepts.
  • You now need to complete the remaining activities for this module before moving on to the next module where we examine content marketing and content distribution strategies.

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